Vaccines and Students

Ashton Livingston, Entertainment Editor

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       Vaccinations are a method in which you are given a dead cell of a virus or disease so your body can create the proper white blood cells to kill off any future infections or disease. Oregon nearly passed a law making it so students who were not up to date on vaccinations would be taken out of school.

      Nevin Jarvis, a student who is not vaccinated, has a genetic mutation in which his body keeps toxin in longer than most. “I was vaccine injured, which caused neurological damage.”, says Jarvis. Jarvis talked of how he would miss his senior year and never able to experience Prom if the law went into play.

       House bill 3063, the bill that was going to introduce mandatory vaccinations, made exemptions for students or people who had a medically diagnosed reason for not being vaccinated.

          “That’s tough for me because as a biology teacher I see how vaccinations work and that they are effective and I know how they work but the parent side of me, the human side says everyone should have a choice,” Nonamaker states.

         There are events across the United States,  such as festivals, that support the anti vaxx side of the issue. One of the largest arguments for this side is that vaccinations cause autism. “There is no evidence that vaccinations cause autism.”, states Nonamaker.

          Most information stating that there is a link between autism and vaccinations is undoubtedly false and has little to no information to back it up. The Lancet published an article in 1999 that attempts to make a connection between the two. The article itself is written in an unclear way that makes little to no sense.

          The author of the article Andrew J. Wakefield was a doctor in the U.K. at the time and soon became an activist against vaccinations. Since his radical views he is no longer allowed to practice medicine.

          This statement is very vague and can be twisted and turned into whatever one desires. The biggest debate over vaccinations is if it causes autism and there is no evidence showing a connection. The argument is built on the spread of misinformation.  House bill 3063 would have made mandatory vaccinations for students who are in the public education system. “I don’t think it’d affect the students as much as it would affect the anti-vaxx parents”, says Nonamaker.